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deathroll

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deathroll last won the day on December 13 2015

deathroll had the most liked content!

About deathroll

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  1. Well, we are supposed to get a very quick little cold snap this weekend. Gonna heat right up again Monday. We'll see if 2 to 3 days makes any kind of difference. NICE fish by the way!
  2. Well man, sounds like you know a lot more than us fishermen visiting the site here. That's great. Thing is, your contention doesn't quite match up with my actual fishing observations, or the observations of my fishing buddies or of oakleaf here on the Online Fisherman. Been fishing Tampa Bay, by boat, for 15 years now, average at least once a week, motoring and fishing from the Gandy/Weedon Island area south across all the flats, to Pinellas Point, under the Skyway and along and out past Ft. Desoto. Use live bait and an array of artificials. And I/we are not finding fish right now. So good to get your input though. Now let me get this straight, it's called "fishing", not "gauranteeing", right; so very helpful.
  3. Thanks oakleaf. I appreciate not only the response but confirmation of the sincere observation that I made while out fishing. Seems strange that EVERYTHING would disappear, especially as the water is not really cold as yet.
  4. Anybody been out in the Bay recently? No?
  5. Lots and lots of boats/guys out working the mullet run in Tampa Bay. These guys work hard; stay out 24/7. They're all throwing cast nets, no big seines or gill nets or anything. And they are getting mullet but, there are no other fish out there. Yeah, I know, maybe it's me, and maybe it is, but me and my buddies are fishing waters we know, and yet, nuttin honey, a few ladies and a couple of puffers but no real fish. The water's not cold yet, still above 70 but there just aren't any trout or reds. Anybody know anything about the mullet run and if/how it affects recreational fishing in Tampa Bay?
  6. Excellent! I LOVE blue crabs; my favorite meal but I've never seen this. Not sure I need or want to eat a bunch of thick fried batter but I sure did enjoy your photos and learning about something new (at least to me).
  7. Could not agree more. I fish 3 times/week, very much enjoy actually catching fish when I get out and both understand and appreciate the need/value of conservation/preservation/science. I appreciate the men and women who are interested enough and care enough to go to school, earn degrees, earn higher degrees, accrue education debt and then objectively conduct scientific studies, all for $35,000 to $75,000/year researching what's best for the resource. I also understand that what's best for the resource is what's best for those interested in harvesting that resource (me). Nice thread, Captain Rodney. Thanks for supporting science (my desire to catch fish).
  8. More "cool" - http://www.ultraskiff.com/
  9. https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/gofishcam/gofish-cam?ref=category
  10. Alongside your kayak in 15 to 25 minutes and swims away kicking after that. I've caught tarpon from both motorized boats and kayaks and they are very different things. Boat fisherman get long runs followed by long, grueling fights dragging the fish back to them. Yak fisherman get runs and rides but do not have to give away and then take back hundreds of yards of line to/from the fish, again and again and again. When you catch a tarpon from a kayak, you are always either puling the fish back to the yak or pulling the yak to the fish. You are constantly gaining on him. There is much less rod, reel and line needed for the sport of yak fishing than is needed from an anchored boat.
  11. More than enough. Tarpon from a kayak is very different than tarpon from a boat, bridge or pier. From a conventional boat or stationary structure, folks have to play, tire out and then haul a tarpon in and they need a lot of rod, reel and line to do so. From a kayak, you don't need near as much rod, reel or line, as the fish is not running away from you but is instead dragging you along (in a very light and streamline craft). You can literally lock your drag down and prevent any line from escaping. What's more, you may reel your yak closer to the fish as much as you reel the fish closer to the yak. Good luck.
  12. Do not scale. Preheat oven to 425. Place fish on an oven rack and place fish/rack into heated oven. Leave for 10 minutes, then turn the fish over and leave for another 10 minutes. Take the fish out and serve. Use 2 forks to peel fish open (two halves). Remove bones and/or meat. Salt and pepper. Lemon to taste. Leaves the skin and scales intact.Note: nothing more simple, it works and it's delicious.
  13. Hooked my 1st one on 5-2-13. Jumped 3 times. Forgot to bow and he was gone.Hooked my next one yesterday. Believe the kayak helped a LOT. Once hooked, he jumped 3 times and then just towed us around until he was tired. Moving kayak has got to be much easier than a stationary/anchored boat or pier.All the best.
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