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firecat1981

The PLYTANIC! (design and building a flats skiff)

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Well since I finished building my last boat I have been thinking about design changes and things I want to do differently. Thanks to a kid hitting me in his moms SUV and his insurance totaling it out I guess I now get the chance. ;) I started making small models to figure out the curves and dimensions I will end up with. The model is rough and will give me an idea, but I really perfer to adjust on the fly during the build, and I like the wood to take on it's natural curves. I hope to have it water ready by the summer. My design so far has it sitting about 15.5ft long and a max beam of 52 inches at the chines. Interior layout is yet to be determined, but I'm toying with a grab bar console, front and rear decks, and maybe a poling platform.Stay tuned, heres a few snaps of the model so far, this is the latest version as I have built and adjusted 4 so far. I have to work on the sides tomorrow.Posted ImagePosted Image

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I made a run to FGCI yesterday and bought a ton of resin, some glass, and misc. other items. Then I ordered some wood and fillers from boat builder central which I will pick up tomorrow. Total bill for yesterday was around $900! Building your own boat may be cheaper then buying a new one, but it's not free.I finished my model with some complications and mess ups. The full scale boat will have much better lines because it will flex out smoother.Posted ImagePosted ImageTomorrow it officially starts.

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Foam is pricey stuff, I considered it for about a second, however in a small boat it doesn't benefit you much because of the extra glass you will need to make it strong enough would weigh more then the wood. A larger boat is a different story.Well this is what $900 worth of wood and glass supplies looks like.Posted ImageIt's not much is it :(. I went to boat builder central in vero beach today to get everything else I needed. Originally I ordered 6mm meranti, but after seeing it and trying to flex it I knew it wasn't going to work so I swapped it for the 4mm. Since I'm using a heavier biaxial cloth this isn't an issue and will still work out stronger then my last boat. While there I got to chat with Jacque, I bit hard to understand with his accent, however it was clear he has more boat design knowlege in his little finger then I will ever have.I also got to look at an fs17 they had there in the shop. If I ever decide I need a bigger rig, this is probably the one I would build.

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Well I couldn't help it, I had to start on something. I made the main cut on the long panels and laminated the transom.Hard to tell, but thats 4 panels stacked and cut, long sides for the hull bottom and shorts for the sides.Posted ImageTransom boards primed and then slathered with thickened epoxy.Posted ImageWeight to hold it while it cures.Posted Image

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Had the weekend off, but I needed to get something, Anything done. However mother nature decided to mess with me and send another cold front through. Still I push on.Thought about getting a heater, but before we know it it will be 90 degrees again, but for a temp adjustment I went the simple route :Dsuspended away from anything, and plugged into gfci for safety. I'll shut it down before bedtime, but it's keeping the garage in the low 70's high 60's so far and it's about 40 outside.Posted Imagestarted laying out my patterns, I was going to stop here but decided to keep going.Posted ImagePosted Imagepanels cut out, drilled, and lined up.Posted Imageepoxy primedPosted Imagea little bit of thickened epoxy in between the joints to be taped. Then I laid some Biaxial tape alont the seams, wet it out, covered it with wax paper and some luan strips to keep it all lined up.Posted ImageI'll finish cutting out the frames and transom tomorrow, but that might be it until we come back from a cruise next week.

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firecat1981 wrote:

No man anyone can do it, it's very easy, well it's alot easier if you buy a kit. Capt Steves project looks a little bigger then my skiff :)

Not everyone has the knack to work with their hands. Don't sell your self short.I feel fortunate in a lot of ways that my life's course has been to work in a mechanical or construction type trade of some sort where I learned how to work with tools.Working with fiberglass is all new to me. I will have to give a lot of credit for my rebuild as it comes along to Hammerhead Boat Works. I could not even begin to think of how to do it the right way with out some professional help.Looking forward to watching your build as it comes along. I am sure this next one will come along much smoother for you now that you have one behind you.On a separate note we are doing some shop clean up down at Hammerhead. He has some heavy glass down there he wants to get rid of. May be something you can use. Looks to be a fair amount on a couple of rolls. Let me know if your interested and I will find out exactly what it is. Should be able to hook you up for a song and a dance. ;)

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If you only knew about it a week ago, lol. I thank you sir, but I've got all I need for now.You will see soon how simply glass work really is. It takes some time and patience, but really it's not complicated at all, Heck I learned most of what I know from youtube videos and other fishing forums.What has always amazed me through my learning is how cheaply production boats are typically made, even the pricey ones. And how misinformed people are when it comes to wood cored boats.

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The panels bonded well and perfectly even. The biaxial tape isn't nearly as nice looking as cloth, but it will all be prettied up in the end.Posted ImageLaying out my framesPosted ImageZip ties will set you free! :DPosted ImageIt looks just like the model in full scale, actually it looks alot like my old boat just wider. I Kinda wish I made it more aggressive, but at the same time I really want to keep my skinnywater ability and stability. I sat there looking at it for 20 minutes thinking about making changes, but in the end I decided I like it. Most of the time I only use the motor for a 5 minute run and then the trolling motor the rest of the time and this design will work well for what I want.Setting up the framing.Posted ImagePosted ImageBuilder notes:I'm not enjoying working with the meranti, it splinters like crazy, and is a pain to cut. It actually has thinner veneers then the cheap Luan I used last time which had almost equal layers, Which I thought BS1088 was supposed to have. At $40 a sheet I don't know if I would use it again.

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That is good info because I used the cheap luan for my canoe and I thought I would go the much more expensive marine ply next time. I will definately look before I buy if I decide to build another boat. I do enjoy it for some reason.

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The cheap tri-ply luan and bc plywood worked out well for me last time. Never had any delamination issues or failures, well outside of the wreck. Except for the hull, the rest of the boat will be BC ply again. When I build my next one in a few years, I think I will shop around at some cabinet places and maybe go with a nicer luan or maybe a birch of some sort.Don't get me wrong, I am happy I'm using the meranti, it's just a pain to work with, even the 1/2 inch sheet I have splinters alot.

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Ok back to the garage, only had a few minutes to spend on the boat today. I started fitting and shaping the side panels.Transom cut down and set in place, I use a few drywall screws to hold the side to the transom. The transom is set at 14 degrees.Posted ImageI stitched part of the side and then played with the angles till I was happy.Posted ImagePosted ImageI traced the shape and cut it out.....errr cut it out as best I could ;)Posted ImageI hope to have the sides finished tomorrow, and the boat ready for final stitching and filleting.

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Loves me some zip ties :DPosted Imagestitching up the sidesPosted Imagegetting therePosted ImageNow I'm sure some of you are thinking, man those sided look a bit tall....Well they are, but I made them extra tall so I would have planty to trim off later to create a flat sheer.Posted ImageMy fancy scribing tool ;DPosted ImagePosted ImageSide panels now cut, shapped, and epoxy primed along with the transom and hull bottom.Posted Image

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I got her stitched back together and she looks good. I tried using some bailing wire and also some 40lbs test mono leader, but I keep going back to the zip ties cause they are much easier and faster. I used the 1/2" dowels again to help keep things lined up well.Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImageAfter it was stitched together I used some thickened epoxy to bond the transom and also to "spot weld" in between the stitches. Once it cures I will go back and remove the zip ties and then make my final epoxy fillets.Posted ImageThis is my tool of choice for quick and easy bonding. It is a caulk tool from home depot, it's not wide enough for the fillets I like, but for quickly and cleanly bonding corners it works great.Posted ImageLast shot of the night, here you can see the flat sheer, well some what.Posted Image

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Was hoping to get more done this afternoon, but I only had about an hour and a half to work with.I removed all the stitches from the sides and laid down my fillets.Posted ImageI use a big popsicle stick to get a fairly clean 1/2"+/- radius.Posted ImageMore to come in the next few days.

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What ever she is named she is coming along nicely.My rebuild is at a slow down right now. I did get my under deck ventilation in today but that's about it.Have a few under deck drains to install(probably do it tomorrow) then just insatll a couple of rigging tubes.What I really need to get done is to build my rear cap so I can flip it and glass the cap to the hull and send her off to the sandblaster to get the bottom paint off.OK enough of hijacking your thread. LOLI really am enjoying your build. Can you slow down a bit so I can savor it? :laugh:

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Slow down? I'm barely moving! Each day I set goals and usually only get through maybe half of them, including today.I started taping the seams in preperation of putting in the stringers and flipping it this weekend, hopefully.Laying out the baxial tape.Posted Imagewetted out, those 2 strips towards the front are just scraps I had, but I figured that area could use some reinforcement for better shape retension. I will be adding more tape and cloth after I finish the bottom and start back on the interior, I just put enough in right now to make it solid.Posted ImageBelieve it or not I anticipated having an issue with the flat surface trying to curve upwards. It's just a natural reaction the wood takes when you force it into curved positions and it happened on my last boat too. The stringers will help correct this, but to minimize any impact beyond that I laid down 2 strips of tape across the curve and weighed them down. When everything is cured the curve will be very minimal and then the stringers will do the rest.Posted Image

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