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jayfack27

One to add to your carry-on

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Just a thought; how come nobody (including myself thus far) carries a set of goggles in their yak gear? It'd be much easier than having to buy all kinds of floats that take up space and teathers and such.

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I always have my mask and snorkel and fins with me as I know at some point in the day I am going to want to take a jump in to cool off and look around. but I feel much safer having everything tied down or on a float as if it does go over I don't want to have to chase it down and keep diving for it or losing it in the current or in waters deeper then I can free dive

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What do you mean easier than buying floats and stuff? I have some in the car but it'll be a good idea to keep it around. There's been times where nothings biting but theres some manatees that want to play. They'd be fun to watch

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it'd just be cheaper/less clutter in the yak to just have a pair of goggles. I see people with literally everything corded down or with a big float on it. I went to buy some retractable cords, but they were kind of expensive, and I wouldn't want random (non retractable) cords all over my yak strapping down things. I also hear of many yakkers losing rods in a tip over. You can easily free dive down 20 feet to search for your rods with a set of goggles.

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If you flip your kayak in 20ft. I highly doubt you will recover all your gear. It's almost impossible to stay put in one place unless your anchored. I myself couldn't free dive without fins in 20ft. Multiple times to recover gear. I think it's easier to leash everthing. I definitely wouldn't be free diving in 200+ ft. where I fish...lol

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If you flip your kayak in 20ft. I highly doubt you will recover all your gear. It's almost impossible to stay put in one place unless your anchored. I myself couldn't free dive without fins in 20ft. Multiple times to recover gear. I think it's easier to leash everthing. I definitely wouldn't be free diving in 200+ ft. where I fish...lol

I don't think a rod would be too hard to find even in 20'. Plus it's worth a try. I'd be there all day looking if it was my rods. Actually now that I think about it, we've dropped $100 goggles in the water spear fishing in 20' exactly almost and I threw a mask on and dove in and got them almost instantly. No fins. It really isn't that hard if the clarity is there. Things don't move that quick, and when it is ripping, you have an idea of where it's going.

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it'd just be cheaper/less clutter in the yak to just have a pair of goggles. I see people with literally everything corded down or with a big float on it. I went to buy some retractable cords' date=' but they were kind of expensive, and I wouldn't want random (non retractable) cords all over my yak strapping down things. I also hear of many yakkers losing rods in a tip over. You can easily free dive down 20 feet to search for your rods with a set of goggles.[/quote']The first time it actually happens you might have a different view. If you are in any kind of wind and in more than 4 or 5 feet of water, I can guarantee that you will drift a fair distance before you get the kayak upright. Spots out in the middle of a body of water all look alike. Even if you only drift twenty feet , that would give you a search circle 40 feet in diameter. The area of that circle is 1,256 square feet. Good luck searching that in dark water. I only had it happen once but my rods are all equipped with small floats that keep them on the surface for easy retrieval. Murphy's Law ensures that I will probably never need them but after losing three along with a collapsible net, I breathe and fish easier knowing it can't happen again.Also, my fishing buddy dropped a rod overboard in about 3.5 feet of water. The bottom was very silty / mucky and the water was stained. We spent over an hour probing and dragging for it and found nothing. That rod was under a layer of silt so fast it was like the bottom swallowed it. Floats are real cheap insurance. If my yak ever does tip again, all I stand to lose is a few baits

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it'd just be cheaper/less clutter in the yak to just have a pair of goggles. I see people with literally everything corded down or with a big float on it. I went to buy some retractable cords' date=' but they were kind of expensive' date=' and I wouldn't want random (non retractable) cords all over my yak strapping down things. I also hear of many yakkers losing rods in a tip over. You can easily free dive down 20 feet to search for your rods with a set of goggles.[/quote'']The first time it actually happens you might have a different view. If you are in any kind of wind and in more than 4 or 5 feet of water, I can guarantee that you will drift a fair distance before you get the kayak upright. Spots out in the middle of a body of water all look alike. Even if you only drift twenty feet , that would give you a search circle 40 feet in diameter. The area of that circle is 1,256 square feet. Good luck searching that in dark water. I only had it happen once but my rods are all equipped with small floats that keep them on the surface for easy retrieval. Murphy's Law ensures that I will probably never need them but after losing three along with a collapsible net, I breathe and fish easier knowing it can't happen again.Also, my fishing buddy dropped a rod overboard in about 3.5 feet of water. The bottom was very silty / mucky and the water was stained. We spent over an hour probing and dragging for it and found nothing. That rod was under a layer of silt so fast it was like the bottom swallowed it. Floats are real cheap insurance. If my yak ever does tip again, all I stand to lose is a few baits
I've literally found goggles dropped myself 20 miles out of Hudson which is about 20'. That's much further than I could get on a yak lol. A rod would be much easier than goggles. I didn't say it would always work, but it'd be worth trying. I can't imagine not being able to find a rod unless the conditions are just all against you. Most of my fishing is shallow anyway, so goggles will be fine if I ever did tip or drop something. That's another point, it's not always a tip. Say you drop something, quickly anchor and jump in and you should easily find it. I'm not saying it'll always work, but it's an easy carry on that would allow you to at least try.

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it'd just be cheaper/less clutter in the yak to just have a pair of goggles. I see people with literally everything corded down or with a big float on it. I went to buy some retractable cords' date=' but they were kind of expensive' date=' and I wouldn't want random (non retractable) cords all over my yak strapping down things. I also hear of many yakkers losing rods in a tip over. You can easily free dive down 20 feet to search for your rods with a set of goggles.[/quote'']The first time it actually happens you might have a different view. If you are in any kind of wind and in more than 4 or 5 feet of water, I can guarantee that you will drift a fair distance before you get the kayak upright. Spots out in the middle of a body of water all look alike. Even if you only drift twenty feet , that would give you a search circle 40 feet in diameter. The area of that circle is 1,256 square feet. Good luck searching that in dark water. I only had it happen once but my rods are all equipped with small floats that keep them on the surface for easy retrieval. Murphy's Law ensures that I will probably never need them but after losing three along with a collapsible net, I breathe and fish easier knowing it can't happen again.Also, my fishing buddy dropped a rod overboard in about 3.5 feet of water. The bottom was very silty / mucky and the water was stained. We spent over an hour probing and dragging for it and found nothing. That rod was under a layer of silt so fast it was like the bottom swallowed it. Floats are real cheap insurance. If my yak ever does tip again, all I stand to lose is a few baits
Amen......I lost a rod in about 15' water that was dark an not fit for swimming IMO. It was as stupid mistake since I knocked it out of the rod holder while paddling.I didn't panic seeing I had my castnet with me on the kayak as well . But,after tossing it fifteen times or so with no luck I learned an expensive lesson the hard way. I still don't have floats attached, but I make sure to use the straps to my left an right rod holders while in travel. Just too easy to get the paddle under a reel arm and cause a mistake.

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I've literally found goggles dropped myself 20 miles out of Hudson which is about 20'. That's much further than I could get on a yak lol. A rod would be much easier than goggles. I didn't say it would always work, but it'd be worth trying. I can't imagine not being able to find a rod unless the conditions are just all against you. Most of my fishing is shallow anyway, so goggles will be fine if I ever did tip or drop something. That's another point, it's not always a tip. Say you drop something, quickly anchor and jump in and you should easily find it. I'm not saying it'll always work, but it's an easy carry on that would allow you to at least try

It would absolutely work in some instances and goggles are a great idea to have on board. My point is that a $2 float eliminates all worries.

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I've literally found goggles dropped myself 20 miles out of Hudson which is about 20'. That's much further than I could get on a yak lol. A rod would be much easier than goggles. I didn't say it would always work' date=' but it'd be worth trying. I can't imagine not being able to find a rod unless the conditions are just all against you. Most of my fishing is shallow anyway, so goggles will be fine if I ever did tip or drop something. That's another point, it's not always a tip. Say you drop something, quickly anchor and jump in and you should easily find it. I'm not saying it'll always work, but it's an easy carry on that would allow you to at least try[/quote']It would absolutely work in some instances and goggles are a great idea to have on board. My point is that a $2 float eliminates all worries.
can you even add a float to a rod that would make it float and not be in the way though? Just seems to me if one was able to make a rod float, it would be in the way and a hassle when fishing. i believe my paddle floats, so there is no reason to strap it down where i fish. Its not like i fish rapids where i couldn't swim and grab it if i needed to. My fish lip grippers float. I wouldn't be too mad if i lost my pliers. I personally just have no need for a bunch of floats on all my stuff. The only thing id be worried about losing is rods, and I would think it would be very easy to find a rod with goggles in 90% of cases that you'd fish on a kayak. either way, seems most of you don't agree. I was just suggesting an idea for a backup plan or whatever if you tip. Many of you seem to have lost rods, and i think goggles would at least allow you to go searching.

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We have floats on our kayak rods/reels. They work fine. They keep the rod/reel on the surface if dropped overboard. They do not interfere with fishing. The only slight drawback is the line will slap them a bit if you reel in very fast without anything but a hook on the line. I have been with people who have flipped their kayak. If they had not been in water that was only 4-5 feet deep, they would have lost stuff. Just as said before. If the water is a little murky and you flip and drift a bit, you're not going to find most of your gear that goes overboard.

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I don't think everyone is disagreeing with you. I think it's a good idea as a back up. But make sure to add a float or leash to your goggles...lol. I don't use a leash while I have a rod in my hand, but my other 2 rods that are behind me and outta the way are leashed. I also leash my gopro, paddle, pliers. I have a trident 13 so my tackle, keys, wallet are inside the kayak. You are lucky to fish in clear waters. I live in South Florida and fish mainly offshore. Our inshore fishing consists of mostly fishing murky waters. I lost a rod and cast net on one of my first trips on my kayak. 3 of my friends looked for over and hour with no luck. We were only in about 5' of water. You would think tossing treble hooks in the general area would at least hooked the net...but nothing. I will definitely bring a mask with me inshore when we fish clear waters. Offshore...not a chance.

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