Tides   

Fishing the Weather

If you read my stuff, you know that I talk a lot about the past. I often mention indigenous people or American Indians[this is the correct term preferred by American Iindians]. There were literally thousands of cultural groups nationwide and a few dozen major ones here in Florida. They were no nicer to each other than the Europeans were to them, Europeans simply had advanced technology and diseases to which the indigenous had no natural antibodies and the rest is history.

If you read my stuff, you know that I talk a lot about the past. I often mention indigenous people or American Indians[this is the correct term preferred by American Iindians]. There were literally thousands of cultural groups nationwide and a few dozen major ones here in Florida. They were no nicer to each other than the Europeans were to them, Europeans simply had advanced technology and diseases to which the indigenous had no natural antibodies and the rest is history.

But they knew the weather. I would wager they knew it like their lives depended on it.

I would wager to say that I don’t know a single angler who doesn’t rely on their smartphones to check tides and weather (at least). Based on numbers–which are something near and dear to any publisher, web or otherwise–reports about the bite come in a very close second. So clearly, smartphones will help an angler to be more prepared for what is going to happen, right?

Maybe. We are no strangers to smartphones being used to make one a better angler. I was writing stories about using Google Earth to find new fishing spots years ago. It actually earned me a nasty reputation on local forums for giving away secret spots. Never mind that there are no such things as secret spots; they have all been fished and at times have been fished so hard there were literally no fish left for a week or two. Or a month or a year.

Smartphones–especially apps that show you radar in your immediate area–can save your life if you keep your eye on them. The problem comes when you don’t keep your eye on them or they don’t have a good signal, which can be in a lot of places.

Not So Smart But Effective Forecasting

Smartphones can be used to help ensure you’re not going to get in trouble, but they’re not the only way. Sometimes you can’t beat good old-fashioned observation.

Pay attention to local forecasts. While we do not trust the scientific community in their ability to forecast worldwide weather patterns in the coming millennium, they are somewhat–but not totally–accurate for the next few hours.

Pay attention to the air. When we say pay attention to the air, we’re talking not only about looking at the sky. The sky here on the west coast of Florida can be downright scary at times on one side of your head and post card perfect on the other. The air will often tell you something too; a cool breeze over your shoulder might feel great but if you take a peek, the sky might be that special kind of dark that only a dangerous thunderhead can display during the daytime.

Be Brave

The bummer–or the fun, depending on how crazy you happen to be–is that the best time to fish is often the worst time to be out there. Fishing offshore in burning hot weather without a breeze can produce as many fish at the right time as perfect breezy (but not windy) days. Cold windy nights inshore can produce Snook that break you off while laughing, and Largemouth Bass seem to love the sound of frogs eating mosquitos and mosquitos eating you. Either way, we strongly recommend that you become willing to fish under the worse of conditions.

Don’t be crazy and fish while the sky is lighting up with dangerous electrical bolts of death, but wind, rain, cold, sleet and ice (well, in the cooler at least), burning sun, and drought should not stop you from giving us great content to write about and share with the other people that read the stories we write to teach, inform, or entertain you.



The Online Fisherman

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