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Man Those Are Big Fish

When it comes to big fish, even those who are not anglers are amazed at the enormity of some of God's creatures

When it comes to big fish, even those who are not anglers are amazed at the enormity of some of God's creatures. These animals live on the planet Earth with us, yet we barely see them, never mind catch them. Here, we present here a roundup of behemoths that have been caught in either fresh or salt water. Some are from the United States and some are from far-flung locales such as Vietnam and Africa.

opah-slider97.4 pounds of Opah. Photo: iFish.net

The first photo below is of an Opah caught in Hawaii. The Opah in Hawaii range from 60 to over 200 pounds. A pelagic wandering species, it is often found in the company of tunas and billfish. Almost all of the Opah landed in Hawaii are caught by long-lining.

Opah-hawaiiAn Opah caught in waters off Hawaii.

The second photo below is of a 1,004 pound, 12-foot long White Sturgeon caught at San Pablo Bay, San Francisco. White Sturgeons are found along the Pacific coast from the Aleutian Islands to California, U.S.A.

sturgeon-san-franciscoA 1,000-pound White Sturgeon caught in San Pablo Bay.

The third photo below is of a 1,211 pound Blue Marlin caught off Kona in Hawaii. This "Grander," as they're called when over 1,000 punds, ate a Sky-blue lure at 4,200 feet off Casa de Emdeko. The tail hanging out of its mouth is a 35-pound tuna he was eating. That's what greed will get you!

Blue-marlin-KonaA Blue Marlin caught off Kona, Hawaii, weighs in at 1,211 pounds.

This fourth photo is a record-setting Paddlefish. In the photo, Rory, from North Star Caviar, poses with the new state record fish at the cleaning station. Paddlefish have been fished almost to extinction for their rich eggs (roe), which is called "Poor Man's Caviar," even though one female Paddlefish can bring $5,000.

A female Paddlefish takes about 10 years before it grows big enough to spawn. Only two species of Paddlefish remain in existence, the Chinese and the American Paddlefish, although the Chinese is now though to be extinct. As far as American Paddlefish and its near-extinction, overfishing is one reason, and another reason is the dams constructed on many major U.S. river systems. Paddlefish avoid fish ladders because of the metal rebar used in construction, which disrupts their electro-magnetic sense organs. The dams block paddlefish migration routes that are very important to the fish for spawning.

paddlefish-recordA record-setting American Paddlefish at the cleaning station.

This fifth photo shows a Giant Siamese Carp (giant barb) caught in a Vietnam river. These fish are very rare because pollution and excessive commercial fishing has nearly wiped them out from their natural habitat. Recently, a program in Thailand has successfully bred these fish and stocked lakes around Thailand.

giant-barb 539 600x450A Giant Siamese Carp caught in a Vietnam river.

Photo six below shows a huge 1,500-pound Greenland shark caught with nets. These behemoths are very mysterious and rarely observed. The first underwater photos of a live Greenland shark were taken in the Arctic in 1995, and the first video images of a Greenland shark swimming were not obtained until 2003. Greenland sharks are native to the North Atlantic waters around Greenland, Canada, and Iceland. They are the only true sub-Arctic shark and the only shark that can tolerate Arctic temperatures year-round. In the summer, they stay deep where water is coldest. Greenland sharks have been observed as deep as 7,000 feet. They are sometimes seen resting on continental shelves and slopes at these great depths. This shark rivals the Great White shark in terms of size, growing up to 20 feet and weighing 2,500 pounds.

GREENLAND-SHARKA huge 1,500-pound Greenland shark caught with nets.

Photo seven below shows angler Donna Pascoe with a near world-record Pacific Bluefin Tuna. A monster fish at 907 pounds, she had a five-hour struggle on 130-pound tackle to land this giant. She caught this titan fishing off a charter boat in north New Zealand at the famed King Bank.

blufin-tunaDonna Pascoe with a near world-record Pacific Bluefin Tuna at 907 pounds.

Photo eight below shows Vic Evans of the UK with the biggest Conger eel ever caught with rod-and-reel. The Conger is found from Norway and Iceland to the eastern Atlantic. They are also found in the Mediterranean and Black Seas. Congers have a maximum length of about 11 feet and weigh up to 265 pounds, making them the largest eels in the world.

biggest-conger-rod-reelVic Evans of the UK with the biggest Conger ever caught with rod-and-reel.

Photo nine below shows a 450-pound Goliath Grouper caught by Buddy Jenks at the Big Indian Rocks Fishing Pier in Florida in that great year, 1976.

GOLIATH-GROUPER-INDIAN-ROCKSA 450-pound Goliath Grouper caught by Buddy Jenks at the Big Indian Rocks Fishing Pier.

Photo ten below shows the world record 2,664-pound Great White Shark caught in Australia by A. Dean.

GREAT-WHITE-RECORDThe world record 2,664-pound Great White Shark caught in Australia by A. Dean.

Photo eleven below shows angler Danny Aderhold with a Flathead Catfish weighing 79 lbs. and 9 oz. The giant Cat was caught in the Cooper River in South Carolina. Although Aderhold's flathead is technically the state's record, but the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources said it must beat the previous record by more than 8 ounces to take the title. Aderhold missed it by only a few ounces. Bummer.

flathead-catfishDanny Aderhold with a Flathead Catfish weighing 79 lbs. and 9 oz.

Photo twelve below shows a Goliath Tigerfish from the Congo River in Africa. This large, ferocious fish is a native of the Congo River basin and a few rivers in Africa. This fierce predator has 32 protruding, daggerlike teeth up to one-inch long that will cut your line like butter. When those teeth slam down on prey, it's a clean, almost surgical cut. Those attributes, combined with its muscular physique, make the Goliath Tigerfish a state-of-the-art mayhem machine. The locals say it's the only fish that doesn't fear crocodiles and it eats the smaller ones. It will attack humans in rare instances. Good thing it's not in Florida rivers!

 

Goliath-tigerfish-Congo-river-africaA Goliath Tigerfish from the Congo River in Africa.

 



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